Allison Perkeybile

Allison Perkeybile, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral research fellow

Dr. Allison Perkeybile investigates the effects of exogenous oxytocin administration at birth on parental behavior and maternal neurobiology, as well as behavioral and neural developmental trajectories in offspring. Her work supports research by Dr. C. Sue Carter, Distinguished University Scientist at the Kinsey Institute.

Perkeybile's pre-doctoral work examined naturally occurring variation in early infant care in the prairie vole—a biparental rodent in which the father contributes significantly to care of offspring. This research focused on the consequences this variation in early care had on various aspects of social behavior, neuropeptide system function, and stress responsivity for offspring.

 aperkeyb@indiana.edu
 (812) 855-7686

428 Lindley Hall
Indiana University
Bloomington, IN 47405


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Education

  • Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 2014
  • B.S., Wright State University, 2008

Research interests

How early life experiences work to shape:

  • Brain and endocrine functioning
  • Behavioral patterns

Selected publications

  • Bales, KL & Perkeybile, AM. (2012). Developmental experiences and the oxytocin receptor system. Horm Behav, 61:3, 313-319.
  • Perkeybile, AM, Griffin, L, & Bales, KL. (2013). Natural variation in early parental care correlates with social behaviors in adolescent prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster). Front Behav Neurosci, 7:21.
  • Bales, KL, Perkeybile, AM, Conley, OG, Lee, MH, Guoynes, CD, Downing, GM, Yun, CR, Solomon, M, Jacob, S, & Mendoza, SP. (2013). Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles. Biol Psychiat. 74:3, 180-188.
  • Perkeybile, AM & Bales, KL. (2015). Early rearing experience is related to altered aggression and vasopressin production following chronic social isolation in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Behav Brain Res. 283;37-46.
  • Perkeybile, AM & Bales, KL. (2015). Early rearing experience is associated with vasopressin immunoreactivity but not reactivity to an acute non-social stressor in the prairie vole. Physiol Behav. 147:149-156.
  • Perkeybile, AM & Bales, KL. (2015). Early rearing experience is associated with vasopressin immunoreactivity but not reactivity to an acute non-social stressor in the prairie vole. Physiol Behav. 147:149-156.
  • Perkeybile, AM, Delaney-Busch, N, Hartman, SL, & Bales, KL. (2015). Intergenerational transmission of alloparenting and oxytocin and vasopressin receptor distribution. Front Behav Neurosci, 9:191.
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